Church in Kenya

823 Words – Approximate Reading Time 3.5 Minutes

Sundays are always exciting in Kenya. In previous years our team has been small, but this year is different. Because of this, we had 4 people from our team preaching in 4 different places. It was encouraging to hear how God worked at each place.

Curt, a pastor from CA, preached at a church in a nearby village. At the church, there was a lady in attendance who was 106 years old. She is the pastor’s grandmother. Her husband, who was a leader in one of the indigenous cults, told her on his deathbed to never leave their religion. That was years ago.

Her grandson has faithfully loved her to Jesus for years. Last month, she prayed to receive Christ. Sunday was her first time to attend a Bible preaching, Bible believing fellowship—the church her grandson serves. The church was electric and ended with Curt dancing with her. I wish I had a picture to show you, but I wasn’t there.

Another one of our team members, Diana, was asked to preach at a church that has mixed doctrines. The church believes a little of the prosperity gospel and other misinterpretations of Scripture. She received the invitation to share knowing that the whole truth of Jesus had probably never been proclaimed. Twelve people prayed to receive Christ and the pastor confessed the church needs to start preaching the real truth of the Gospel.

18 8 7 Kenya Church3The other two-team members who had the privilege of speaking were Robbie and myself. She and I both spoke to congregations whose pastors have been through the training we provide. These two churches needed encouragement. It is not easy being faithful to Gospel in this place.

The church I spoke at has about 25 members. John and I went there together. We spent the first hour singing…well, really, listening to them sing. The second hour was devoted 18 8 7 Church in Kenya 2to special music, the offering and the preaching of the Word. Before I spoke, John was asked to speak to the church. He did a wonderful job of encouraging the people and reminding them that God has a purpose for their lives and their church.

After he spoke, it was my turn to share God’s word. Preaching in Kenya is challenging on many levels, but one added dimension is preaching with a translator. Basically, I would share the message a sentence at a time pausing at the end of each sentence and letting the translator do his thing.

I saw no public decisions. There was no outward display of God moving in any particular way, but there was a sweet spirit shared among people whose only thing in common was faith in Jesus. Somehow, that was enough.

I recently shared I’ve been reading and meditating on Revelation. Don’t get excited, I don’t know who the anti-Christ is and I don’t know when the world is going to be forced to where the number 666. To be honest, I really haven’t made it out of the first chapter. It is rich.

Before John shares all the images of the future, he says this about the people of God:

All glory to him [Jesus] who loves us and has freed us from our sins by shedding his blood for us. He has made us a Kingdom of priests for God his Father.[1]

“He has made us a Kingdom of priests.” I’ve got news for you…that’s not just the professional preachers and pastors. That’s any person who calls upon name of Christ and has received His grace.

Priests don’t always have a glamorous job. They don’t always get noticed or thanked. God’s priests don’t always speak in front of crowds. Sometimes they don’t even use words at all. His priests don’t have an age requirement…or a gender requirement…or a denominational requirement…or an educational requirement.

However, this Kingdom of priests share some common qualities. They all love Jesus. They love Him so much that they keep His commandments, and when they mess up, they confess their sin and get back to living for Him. They are not loners and they are not ashamed of Jesus. They are willing to make sacrifices for God and their love for others proves they love God. They pursue faithfulness over perfection; love instead of criticism; and generosity takes the place of self-preservation.

It is these qualities that allow people from all nations to come together and experience the presence of God together in the same place. We don’t have to like the same songs…we don’t even have to speak the same language. God’s Kingdom of priests share a common relationship with Christ. That relationship creates an unspoken language that bonds them together through the Holy Spirit.

I am fortunate that I don’t have to come to Kenya to experience what I am trying to describe, but I’m also thankful that I can.

[1] Tyndale House Publishers. (2013). Holy Bible: New Living Translation (Re 1:5–6). Carol Stream, IL: Tyndale House Publishers.

One Comment on “Church in Kenya

  1. It’s wonderful to here how God has used you and the others to encourage and share the gospel! To God be the Glory of great things he has done!

    Like

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